Photoshop Tools

Photoshop  Tools

The Selection tools select pixels, the Brush tools paint on pixels with the foreground color, the Type tool typesets text, and so on. As you might know most tools have hidden tools behind them, indicated by a small black triangle just below and to the right of the tool. Access hidden tools by clicking the mouse button on a tool and selecting it. Tool keyboard shortcuts are shown to the right of the tool name.

Check out all the tools covered in this Guide:

all-ps-tools

Lets start with Move Tool (V)

move-tool

Any time you want to move image pixels (not selection borders alone), you need the Move tool, unless you want to nudge pixels a little at a time with the arrow keys. With the Move tool active, click the mouse button and drag the pixels to move them. If a selection is active, the Move tool moves only the selected pixels on the active layer. If there is no selection active, the Move tool moves all the pixels on the active layer when you drag in the image window.

Tip: If the layer is linked to other layers, the linked layers content also moves.

Marquee Selection Tools (M)

Marquee-selection-tools

Use the Marquee selection tools to select rectangular or oval shapes, or single rows of pixels. Press Shift while you drag with the Rectangular Marquee tool to drag a square, or press Shift while you drag with the Elliptical Marquee tool to drag a circle (release the mouse button first, then release Shift). You can resize these selection borders (not the image pixels) by choosing Select ➪ Transform Selection or by choosing Select ➪ Refine Edge.

Lasso Selection Tools (L)

lasso-tool

Use these tools to select pixels by dragging or clicking around objects. Use the Lasso tool to select rounded or irregular shapes that don’t have to be precise (drag around the shape until you get back to the starting point to close the shape). For precise selections, you can make a Pen tool path and load it as a selection or manipulate duplicates of channels to help you make a selection.

The Polygonal Lasso tool is good for selecting objects with straight edges (click on each corner until you click on the first corner again to close the selection). If the edges are really straight, you can be pretty precise with this tool.

The Magnetic Lasso tool finds the edge of an object as you drag near the edge and the selection snaps to the edge as you drag (drag to the starting point to close the shape). The Magnetic Lasso tool works best on objects whose edges have a lot of contrast with the background. If you don’t want to complete the Magnetic Lasso selection, press ESC.

Quick Selection and the Magic Wand Tools (W)

The Quick Selection and Magic Wand tools select pixels by examining their colors. Use the Quick Selection tool to select multiple different colors that are adjacent to each other but enclosed in a surrounding color that contrasts with all the colors you want to select.

magic-wand

Drag across the colors you want to select. The Magic Wand tool selects colors that are similar to the color you click on with the Magic Wand. The number of colors it selects depends on the Tolerance setting you enter in its Options Bar.

Tip: Add to selections by pressing Shift while you make an additional selection with the same or a different selection tool. Subtract from selections by pressing Alt while
making an additional selection. Or choose Select ➪ Save Selection or Select ➪ Load Selection) to add to or subtract from selections. Load Selection gives you the option of adding or subtracting the loaded selection from an active selection.

Crop Tool (C)

crop-tool

Use the Crop tool to crop an image to its intended size. Drag with the Crop tool, and then move any of its handles to adjust the crop. Press Enter when you’re finished. If you don’t want to complete the crop, press ESC. You can use the Crop tool’s Options Bar to enter the exact dimensions and resolution of your selection, but this can cause undesirable resampling if you are enlarging and don’t have enough resolution. If the dimensions and resolution boxes are blank, you don’t have to worry about resolution resizing problems.

Slice and Slice Select Tools

These tools are used to create and select parts of images that have been sliced up in different sections for better display on the Web. The Slice tool is used to drag through an image to create slices; in other words, to cut the image into grid sections that can be saved with different settings. This way, you may be able to make each section a smaller file. If a large image is left whole and saved for the Web, it might be so large that viewers have to wait for it to load. The Slice Select tool can
be used to select slices.

Eyedropper Tool (I)

eyedropper

Use this tool to find out a colors numbers; to do so, hover the Eyedropper tool over a color in the image while you look in the Info panel. This is helpful when color correcting or if you need to share color number information with someone. You can also use the Eyedropper tool to click on a color in the image to make it the foreground color. Drop the foreground color into the Swatches panel by clicking in the gray area inside the Swatches panel.

Color Sampler Tool

Click with this tool in your image to set permanent color samplers in your image. The sampler and its color numbers appear in the Info panel until you delete the sampler. To delete a color sampler, Alt-click or right-click on the color sampler with the Color Sampler tool and press Delete.

Ruler Tool

Use the Ruler tool to measure distances from one object to another or to straighten an image. To measure, drag the Ruler tool across what you want to measure, and check the Info panel for the measurement information. Click the Record Measurements button in the Measurement Log panel to record the data, which you can then Export with the Measurement Log panel menu. You can also set the Measurement Scale in the Measurement Log panel menu. To straighten an image with
the Ruler tool, drag with the Ruler tool along the edge of something you want to straighten, then choose Image ➪ Transform Canvas ➪ Arbitrary. Photoshop automatically calculates the angle of rotation and straightens the image.

Count Tool

Use the Count tool when you need to count objects in an image. Click once on each object, and a serial number, starting with 1, is placed on each object. Click the Record Measurements button in the Measurement Log panel to record the data, which you can then export with the Measurement Log panel menu. Click the Clear button in the Options Bar to start over with a new count or click the Count Group Color button to change the color of the numbers.

Healing Tools (J)

healing-tool

Use the Healing tools and Patch tool to fill in bad spots, flaws, cracks, or damage with a good nearby texture or a texture in another part of the image, while matching the color that surrounds the flaw. These tools are often good at maintaining texture, but since they pull in some of the surrounding color, it’s usually best not to use the Healing tools or Patch tool when there is an undesirable color nearby.

To repair a flaw with the Spot Healing Brush, make this tool at least a little bit bigger than the flaw and either click on the flaw or drag across it. The flaw should magically disappear. The Healing Brush tool works similar to the Clone Stamp tool, discussed below, in that you Alt + click with the Healing Brush to sample a good place in the image that you want to copy from, then release the mouse button, move the cursor to the flawed area in the image, and start painting over the flaw. The Healing Brush paints from the good area to cover the flawed area. It’s a good idea to make the Healing Brush at least a little bit bigger than the width of the flaw. You may need to resample from different spots often if the good spots are small or if you find you are starting to see repeating patterns in the flaw repair area.

Patch tool

Use the Patch tool to drag a complete shape around a flawed area, then put the cursor inside the selected area and hold down the mouse button while dragging the selected flawed area on top of a good area (even if the color doesn’t match). The flawed area should seem to be magically repaired, with color that matches its surrounding area.

Red Eye Tool

If a person in a photo has red-eye, simply click with the Red Eye tool on the red part of the eye, and it should fill the red part in with black. If it doesn’t work quite right the first time, undo and try it again with a different Pupil Size and/or Darken Amount (in the Options Bar). But my favorite thing to do if it makes too large an area of black is to paint out the part of the black you don’t want from a previous state of the image with the History Brush.

Brush Tool (B)

brush-tool

The Brush tool can be used to paint on an image. It uses the foreground color as the paint color. There are many options you can apply to brushes in the Brushes panel.

The Brush tool has to be selected for the options to be available. When you change the options, you can see what a brush stroke looks like with those options in the bottom of the Brushes panel. One exception to the brush using the foreground color exclusively is that if, in the Brushes panel, you choose Color Dynamics and use foreground/background color Jitter, the brush alternately paints with the foreground and background colors when you drag it. To make a new brush preset, you can choose an existing preset in the Brushes panel, change some options in the Brushes panel, click the New button at the bottom of the panel, and give the new brush a name. You can also drag a rectangular selection around pixels in an image that you want to use for a brush shape, then chooseEdit ➪ Define Brush Preset.

Use the following tips for tools that use brushes (such as Brush tool, Clone Stamp tool, and Eraser):
– Use bracket keys to resize a brush.
– Press Shift+Bracket Keys to change the hardness or softness of a brush’s edges.
– When a brush is active, press the number keys to change the brush’s opacity (2 for 20 percent opacity, 3 for 30 percent opacity, and so on).
– Press the X key to switch foreground and background colors.
– To paint a straight line, click once in an image with a brush tool, release the mouse button, and move the mouse to a different part of the image, then Shift-click with the mouse.This should connect the two areas by painting a straight line.

Pencil Tool

Use the Pencil tool to paint hard-edged lines. You can’t make the Pencil tool have soft edges.

Color Replacement Tool

Use the Color Replacement tool to replace a color in an image with another color. Drag across a color to change it to the foreground color.

The Options Bar settings are critical for this tool:
– Mode: Color. Use this setting to change the color of the sampled area (but not the luminosity or lightness).
– Sampling: Continuous. This tool continually takes samples of the color to replace as you drag, so you can only let the cross-hairs of the brush go over colors you want to change.
– It’s usually best if you make a large brush in this case.
– Sampling: Once. This tool samples the color to change when you first click the mouse button and hold it down to drag across a color.
– Sampling: Background Swatch. This tool changes a color in an image if it is the same color as the background color.

The Clone Stamp and Pattern Stamp Tool (S)

clonestamp

The Clone Stamp tool can be used to fix areas in an image and copy one part of an image over another part. To sample a good part of an image, Alt-click (PC) or Option+click (Mac) with the Clone Stamp tool on a good place in the image that you want to copy from. Then release the mouse button, move the cursor to the flawed area in the image, and start painting over the flaw. It’s good to resample often to avoid repetitive patterns. Use a very soft or semi-soft edge on the brush so that there won’t be a hard edge between the cloned areas and original areas.

The Clone Stamp tool copies exactly from one area to another, but since you have to use a soft edge, some of the textural detail is lost. The Healing Brush tool maintains texture better, but mixes in colors that surround the flawed area, which may be undesirable. You may need to try both tools to see which one works best. The Clone Stamp tool can be set to blending modes other than Normal in the Options Bar for very useful retouching techniques.

Pattern Stamp Tool

You can paint patterns onto an image with the Pattern Stamp tool. Choose a pattern preset in the Options Bar. To make a new pattern preset, make a rectangular selection of image pixels you want to use as a pattern, and choose Edit ➪ Define Pattern.

The History Brush and Art History Brush Tools (Y)

history-brush

The History Brush tool is one of my favorite methods forundoing things, especially just parts of things I don’t want. With the History Brush active, click in a box to the left of a previous History State in the History panel that you want to paint from and drag in the image to paint the previous state of the image.
I especially like to use this to paint out halos when I’ve oversharpened a bit. That way, I can get a lot of extra sharpening in other areas that I might not have been able to if I had stopped before halos appeared. This is useful when sharpening for print, since images tend to soften up on press. You can use reduced opacities with the History Brush, just like other brushes.

The Art History Brush paints from a specified History State just like the History Brush, but it adds a painterly effect.

The EraserBackground Eraser, and Magic Eraser Tools (E)

eraser

Eraser tool erases to transparency the pixels you drag over a regular layer. If you use it on a background layer, it paints with the background color instead of transparency. If you use it on a layer that has locked transparency (see the transparency lock button at the top of the Layers panel), it paints with the background color instead of transparency wherever you drag over pixels, but it leaves transparent pixels transparent (because they are locked).

Background Eraser Tool erases sampled colors of pixels on any kind of layer to transparency as you drag over them with the tool. Samples are taken by the cross-hairs in the center of the brush.

The Magic Eraser tool erases to transparency the sampled colors of pixels on a regular layer when you click on the pixels. If you use it on a background layer, it changes the sampled pixels to the background color instead of transparency. If you use it on a layer that has locked transparency (see the transparency lock button at the top of the Layers panel), it changes sampled pixels to the background color instead of transparency, but it leaves transparent pixels transparent (because they are locked).

Tip: To erase or select objects with intricate or wispy shapes, use the Extract command or another selection method.

The Gradient and Paint Bucket tools (G)

gradient

Gradient tool

Use the Gradient tool to make gradients in a layer that contain gradual transitions from one color to another color or between many colors. You can choose different angles of a gradient, such as linear or radial, in the Options Bar. With the Gradient tool active, click the “Click to edit the gradient” button in the Options Bar to get the Gradient Editor.
Click a preset gradient or make a custom gradient by clicking just under the horizontal gradient bar to put a new color in the gradient or click just above the gradient bar to add a different opacity to part of the gradient. To make the custom gradient into a new gradient preset, enter a name in the Custom box and click the New button. Click OK to set your gradient and close the Gradient Editor. To apply the gradient to a layer, drag in the layer with the Gradient tool. You can drag different angles and distances to get different results.

Paint Bucket tool

When you click to sample a color with the Paint Bucket tool, it fills the sampled color with the foreground color.

The BlurSharpen, and Smudge Tools

blur-tool

You can paint with the Blur tool to blur portions of an image. TheSharpen tool allows you to sharpenportions of an image. You can drag the Smudge tool to smudge parts of an image, as if you weredabbling in finger paint
I prefer to use other methods that have more control over blurring and sharpening. Choose Filter ➪ Blur Filter for other blur options, and Filter ➪ Unsharp Mask or Filter ➪ Smart Sharpen) for other sharpening options. You can use masks or the History Brush to blur or sharpen only certain areas.

The Dodge, Burn, and Sponge tool

blur-tool

The Dodge and Burn tools are used to lighten and darken an image, respectively by using a brush method of application. They are especially useful when you are manipulating duplicates of channels to help you make selections. The main strength of the Dodge and Burn tools is that in the Options Bar you can set the tools to target mostly highlights, shadows, or midtones. This means you don’t have to be as careful when you are using the tools and can usually work more quickly. You can use a larger brush without having to worry as much about affecting areas of a nontargeted lightness that the brush overlaps.

It’s generally a good practice to set the Exposure in the Options Bar to a low number and keep painting an area over and over to build up the effect. That way, it’s easier to avoid overdoing it. Paint with the Dodge tool to lighten areas in an image. In the Options Bar, choose whether to affect mostly highlights, shadows, or midtones. Paint with the Burn tool to darken areas in an image. In the Options Bar, choose whether to affect mostly highlights, shadows, or mid tones.

You can drag the Sponge tool over areas in an image to saturate or desaturate their colors, depending on which option you set in the Options Bar. You may want to set the Flow to a low number and paint over the area multiple times to build up the effect so that you don’t overdo it.

Tip 1: Actually I am a fan of the Sponge tool, but I more often use a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to saturate or desaturate colors (take color out and make pixels look black and white). To make the effect apply to just part of an image (say, if you want a person in color and the background in black and white), use a mask on an adjustment layer to hide part of the effect. Adjustment layers are very flexible because you can make changes to them any time.

Tip 2: When you need to make a very precise, hard-edged selection, and you haven’t found a quicker way to make the selection, the Pen tool is a great tool to use. You can make a path with a Pen tool, then load it as a selection.

The Pen, Freeform Pen, Add Anchor Point, Delete Anchor Point, and Convert Point tools

pen-tool

Paths can be edited very precisely at any time; therefore, they are very flexible. They are stored in the Paths panel with the saved Photoshop file until you delete them.

The paths themselves are vector images, meaning resolution-independent — you can enlarge them as much as you want with no loss of quality.

A path may be used to isolate a photograph of a hard-edged object from its background, for example. In that case, the photo would be dependent on resolution for its quality, but the path itself would not. Okay, not all that useful. But the situation in which the vector property of paths becomes really useful is when you use paths to make solid shapes in an image — a logo that contains only solid-color shapes, for example. Then the whole image would be resolution-independent, and you would not have to worry about losing quality when enlarging it. Another handy thing about paths is that you can easily copy and paste them between Photoshop and Illustrator.

The Pen tool

When you have the time, it’s worthwhile to learn how to use the Pen tool, paths, and shapes. If you’re still not convinced — this is gonna be harsh, but I have to tell you — you can’t be called a Photoshop Expert until you learn how to use the Pen tool. Seriously, learning to use the Pen tool is for your own good, I promise!

Make a path with the Pen tool by clicking to make corner anchor points and dragging to make curve anchor points (points determine the shape of the path) to outline the object you want to isolate or the shape you want to create. Important: Before you start, click the Paths button in the Pen tool Options panel. When you get all the way around your object by clicking or dragging with the Pen tool, click on the starting point to close the path (a circle pops up next to the Pen tool when you hover it over the starting point). Press Ctrl+Z to undo. Don’t get bogged down making your path perfect when you first create it. That’s what the path editing tools are for.

NOTE:

    The Pen tool can have somewhat of a learning curve for those who haven’t used similar tools.

You can use the Freeform Pen tool to drag to make a path that does not need to be precise.

But why would you want to?

Okay, you can check the Magnetic option in the Options Bar to make the Freeform Pen tool snap to the edge of an object while you drag along the edge. (You have to close the shape.) That might give you a pretty good head start on a path, which you could refine later, if Photoshop is able to decipher the location of the edge and if it doesn’t put so many points on the path that it will be too time-consuming to edit. You can probably tell I haven’t yet found a good use for this tool.

You could use the Add Anchor Point tool to click on a path segment to add an anchor point, but if you have the Pen tool active and you have Auto Add/Delete checked in the Options Bar, the Pen tool becomes the Add Anchor Point tool when you hover it over a path segment. You could use the Delete Anchor Point tool to click on an anchor point to delete it, but if you have the Pen tool active and you have Auto Add/Delete checked in the Options Bar, the Pen tool becomes the Delete Anchor Point tool when you hover it over an anchor point. Use the Convert Point tool to click on a curve anchor point to change it to a corner anchor point or drag out from a corner anchor point to change it to a curve point.

TIP: Use the Direct Selection tool to move anchor points or to change path curves by dragging curve anchor point handles (click on the point to see the handles). You can see the Direct Selection and the Path Selection tool set below the Type tool on the Tools panel.

The Type tools

Click in an image with the Horizontal Type tool and start typing to make a horizontal line of text. If you drag a box with the tool and then start typing, the text will be in paragraph form and confined to the box area. Press Enter on the number pad or click the Commit button (check mark) in the Options Bar when you are finished with the text. You can click in the text with the Type tool if you want to edit it later. Click in an image with the Vertical Type tool and start typing to make a vertical line of text. Press Enter on the number pad or click the Commit button (check mark) in the Options Bar when you are finished with the text.

TIP: Fonts, point sizes, color, and other type options can be accessed in the Options Bar and the Character panel. Drag with a Type tool to highlight the type to which you
want to apply options.

When you type with the Horizontal and Vertical Type Mask tools, they make a text-shaped selection. Press Enter on the number pad or click the Commit button (check mark) in the Options Bar when you are finished with the text. You can then save the selection and use it later on a layer or a layer mask, fill or stroke the selection, or anything else you can do to other selections. For best results, make a new layer and select it before you start typing with these tools.

The Path Selection and Direct Selection Tools

path-selection-tool

These tools can be used to edit paths made with the Pen Tool or Shape Tools. Select a path and all its points with the Path Selection tool. Shift-click to select multiple path components on the same path. You can then choose Edit ➪ Free Transformto move the path, nudge it with the arrow keys, or change its size. Use the Direct Selection tool to select and move anchor points or to change path curves by dragging curve anchor point handles (click on the point to see the handles). Shift-click if you want to select multiple anchor points at the same time.

The Shape Tools and Line Tool

shape-tool

Use the Shape tools (Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle, Ellipse, and Polygon) to create vector, resolution independent Shape layers or paths. Click the Shape Layer or Paths button in the Options Bar before you drag in the image with a Shape tool. Press the Shift key while you drag to maintain the shape’s proportions.

Use the Line tool to create vector, resolution-independent lines as Shape layers or paths. Click the Shape Layer or Paths button in the Options Bar before you drag in the image with the Line tool.Use the Custom Shape tool to create vector, resolution-independent Shape layers or paths. Choose a custom shape from the Shape menu in the Options Bar. Click the Shape Layer or Paths button in the Options Bar before you drag in the image with the Custom Shape tool.

Use the Custom Shape tool to create vector, resolution-independent Shape layers or paths. Choose a custom shape from the Shape menu in the Options Bar. Click the Shape Layer or Paths button in the Options Bar before you drag in the image with the Custom Shape tool.

TIP: Create a custom shape by clicking on a path in the Paths panel, then choosing Edit ➪ Define Custom Shape

The 3D Object tools and 3D Camera tools

3d-tool

Basically these tools are using for Change the position, orientation, or size of 3-D objects with the 3D Object tools. You can change the observation point or the camera’s orientation, position, or distance to the 3-D object with the 3D Camera tools.

The 3D tools become active when a 3D layer is selected. Use the 3D object tools to change the position or scale of a 3D model; use the 3D camera tools to change the view of the scene. If your system supports OpenGL, you can also use the 3D Axis to manipulate the 3D model.

Move, rotate, or scale a model with 3D object tools

You can use the 3D object tools to rotate, reposition, or scale a model. While you manipulate the 3D model, the camera view remains fixed. For tips about each 3D tool, choose Panel Options from the Info panel menu , and select Show Tool Hints. Click a tool, then move the cursor into the image window to view tool details in the Info Panel.

      In the Tools panel, click a 3D object tool, and hold down the mouse button to select from the following types:
      – Hold down Shift as you drag to constrain the Rotate, Drag, Slide, or Scale tool to a single direction of movement.
      – Rotate Drag up or down to rotate the model around its x-axis, or side to side to rotate it around its y axis. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to roll the model.
      – Roll Drag side to side to rotate the model around its z axis.
      – Drag Drag side to side to move the model horizontally, or up or down to move it vertically. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to move in the x/z direction.
      – Slide Drag side to side to move the model horizontally, or up or down to move it closer or farther away. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to move in the x/y direction.
    – Scale Drag up or down to scale the model larger or smaller. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to scale in the z direction.

Move the 3D camera

3d-tool2

Use the 3D camera tools to move the camera view while leaving the position of the 3D object fixed.
For tips about each 3D tool, choose Panel Options from the Info panel menu , and select Show Tool Hints. Click a tool, then move the cursor into the image window to view tool details in the Info Panel.

      In the Tools panel, click a 3D camera tool, and hold down the mouse button to select from the following types:
      – Hold down Shift as you drag to constrain the Orbit, Pan, or Walk tools to a single direction of movement.
      – Orbit Drag to orbit the camera in the x or y direction. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to roll the camera.
      – Roll Drag to roll the camera.
      – Pan Drag to pan the camera in the x or y direction. Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to pan in the x or z direction.
      – Walk Drag to walk the camera (z translation and y rotation). Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag to walk in the z/x direction (z translation and x rotation).
      – Zoom Drag to change the field of view of the 3D camera. Maximum field of view is 180.
      – Perspective Camera (Zoom only) Displays parallel lines converging to vanishing points.
                 – Orthographic Camera (Zoom only) Maintains parallel lines without convergence.                 Displays the model in accurate scale view without any perspective distortion.

In the options bar, numeric values show the x, y, and z position of the 3D camera. You can also edit these values manually to adjust the camera view.

The Hand, Rotation, and Zoom Tools

hand-tool
The Rotation tool can rotate the canvas, along with the image, so that the whole canvas looks rotated inside the Photoshop work area. This feature only works if you have certain video cards in your computer. Rotate the image canvas part of the work area with the Rotation tool so that the image and canvas look rotated on-screen.

This is like rotating a piece of paper so that it is in a more comfortable position when you are drawing on it. Drag in the image with the Rotation tool to rotate the canvas. Click the Reset View button in the Options Bar to straighten it back out. zoom

Click in the image with the Zoom tool to zoom in or Alt-click with the Zoom tool to zoom outDouble-click the Zoom tool to get a 100 percent view.

Keyboard shortcuts for the Zoom tool:
– Zoom In. Ctrl+spacebar+click
– Zoom Out. Alt+spacebar+click

Foreground and Background Color tools

color

Click the Default Foreground and Background Colors button to make the foreground color black and the background color white (the defaults). Click the Switch Foreground and Background Colors button to switch the foreground color and background colors.

The foreground color is the color that is used by the Brush tool to paint. To change the foreground color, click a swatch in the Swatches panel, click the Foreground Color box, and choose a color in the Color Picker, or click on a color in the image with the Eyedropper tool. You can also click the Switch Foreground and Background Colors button.

The Default Foreground and Background Colors button D
The Switch Foreground and Background Colors button X

The Eraser and Magic Eraser tools paint the background in color instead of transparent when background layers or layers have transparency locked. When you increase the canvas size of an image, the additional area is filled with the background color. To change the background color, click the Background Color box and choose a color in the Color Picker, or with the Color Picker open, click on a color in the image. You can also click the Switch Foreground and Background Colors button.

The Mode Buttons

mode

When Quick Mask Mode is active, you can use the Brush tool to paint selections onto images. In the default settings in this mode, the selected area appears clear and the unselected area appears in a transparent red (you can reverse this by double-clicking the Quick Mask Mode button and setting new options). When you’re finished painting the selection, click the Quick Mask Mode button to leave Quick Mask Mode, and the selection will be active. The keyboard shortcut to toggle Quick Mask Mode on and off is Q.

The Screen Mode menu includes the following options:
– Standard Screen Mode. The Photoshop workspace takes up most of the screen area.
– Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar. The Photoshop workspace takes up all the screen area.
– Full Screen Mode. The image is shown on a black background and fills the screen.
Other work area components are hidden. The keyboard shortcut F cycles through the screen modes.

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